New Issue of the Journal of Southern Religion



3 comments

Luke Harlow and I are pleased to announce the new volume of the Journal of Southern Religion:

Our features include:

--An article by Chad Seales (University of Texas-Austin) on baptisteries and modernity.

--A roundtable on class in early twentieth-century southern religion, with contributions and responses from Ken Fones-Wolf (West Virginia University), Richard Callahan, Jr. (University of Missouri-Columbia), Jarod Roll (University of Sussex), Alison Collis Greene (Mississippi State University), and John Hayes (Augusta State University).

--An author's reflection on Evangelizing the South by Monica Najar (Lehigh University).

--A review forum on Daniel Williams's God's Own Party, with reviews by Randall Balmer (Columbia University), Darren Dochuk (Purdue University), J. Russell Hawkins (Indiana Wesleyan University), and Mark Silk (Trinity College), and a response from Daniel Williams (University of West Georgia).

--Twenty-six book reviews on the latest scholarship in the field.

Emily Clark, managing editor, and Art Remillard, book review editor, contributed immensely to helping make this issue happen.

Luke and I would like to invite everyone to consider contributing to the next issue of the JSR. As an online journal, we are in the exciting position to compliment traditional articles and book reviews with innovative content like special topic forums, author reflections, interviews, and audio-visual presentation. Any and all ideas are welcomed.

3 comments:

Curtis J. Evans at: September 26, 2011 at 7:55 PM said...

Wow, I just took a quick look at the site. This is some good stuff. I'm already getting into this. Thanks for the link. I'm especially eager to see the reviews of "God's Own Party."

Luke Harlow at: September 26, 2011 at 8:13 PM said...

Thanks Curtis!

Chris Cantwell at: September 27, 2011 at 2:45 PM said...

This is, indeed, a wonderful issue full of top-notch content. It's also my first time reading JSR, and I'm wondering if the editors considered allowing comments on the site for articles? Could be beneficial for the readers and authors who's short pieces may be a part of larger projects.

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