Big Billy and the South



2 comments
by Matt Sutton

"Oh, Billy, Billy, Billy. This is a biggie! Don't let me down, Billy!"--Caddyshack

Just in time for the slackers who are scrambling to place their fall book orders at the very last possible minute, Steven P. Miller's Billy Graham and the Rise of the Republican South will be out in paperback any day now. The book has received extremely positive (and well-deserved) reviews:

"Billy Graham and the Rise of the Republican South, a study of the evangelist's relationship to the cause of civil rights on the one hand and the cause of conservatism on the other, does justice to the tensions and complexities involved—for Graham, for the South and for the country."—Ross Douthat, New York Times

"With this book, Steven P. Miller emerges as a significant new voice in the history of evangelical Christianity. . . . The book opens new territory for modern American religious and political history, and for this reason it should be considered essential reading."—Donald T. Critchlow, Reviews in American History

"Wonderfully readable, engrossing . . . . A captivating history and a profound work of scholarship. Miller ably shows how evangelicalism aided the new conservatism long before the Christian Right exploded onto the scene."—Randall J. Stephens, Journal of American History

"Beautifully written, well argued and carefully researched . . . . Thanks to Miller's engaging and provocative book, Billy Graham and modern conservatism will never look the same."—Social History

[The unnamed reviewer on the Penn website writing for Social History is me. I long for the day that I will be as famous as Randall and therefore worth identifying!]

This is a great book for classes on the modern US, religion, and/or conservatism. Buy it! (And assign it along with Paul's Through the Storm).

2 comments:

Edward J. Blum at: August 15, 2011 at 10:46 AM said...

Agree and agree. Miller's book is terrific and from a press really making a name for itself in religious history (wink, wink)

Randall at: August 15, 2011 at 1:41 PM said...

You're right. It would work really well for the classroom or seminar.

Also, "Sutton" is nearly as famous as "McPherson"!!

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