Art Remillard, We Shall Be Silent



2 comments
If you’re in the mood for irony, then this one’s for you. A colleague recently informed me that tomorrow is, “Silence Day.” The website explains…

Since January 22, 1973 over 50,000,000 babies have had their voices silenced through surgical abortion in this nation alone. Over 4,000 women are emotionally damaged every day. On October 23, people from all over this nation will give up their voices for a day in solidarity for these children. Red arm bands and duct tape will identify them as taking part in the Pro-life Day of Silent Solidarity. They will carry fliers explaining why they are silent and educate others about the plight of the innocent children we are losing every day.

When I reached my office, I Googled “Day of Silence” and found another silence-themed event, held every April devoted to another cause.

The Day of Silence is an annual event held to bring attention to anti-LGBT bullying, harassment and discrimination in schools. Students and teachers nationwide will observe the day in silence to echo the silence that LGBT and ally students face everyday. The Day of Silence is one of the largest student-led actions in the country.

It seems that all sides use the weapon of silence in the culture wars.

2 comments:

Anonymous at: October 23, 2007 at 7:20 AM said...

While taking note of the varied uses of silence as a tactic of protest is suggestive, the assumptions that lead you to place people on "sides" could use a little nuance. I'm not sure that sexual orientation or even opposition to harrassment of LBGT students corresponds definitively with a pro-choice stance.

Art Remillard at: October 23, 2007 at 10:26 AM said...

"I'm not sure that sexual orientation or even opposition to harrassment of LBGT students corresponds definitively with a pro-choice stance."

Neither am I. They're two different issues. I could imagine one person choosing to be silent on both days, supporting both causes. Senator Bob Casey comes to mind.

I was only noting how an ironic internet search revealed two very different ways silence can be used in protest...

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